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Archive for the 'What We Used to Know about Race' Category

Having been detained, indefinitely, by Eric “My People” Holder’s Civil Rights (for Everyone but Whites) Division of the (Social) Justice Department of these United States of (Post-Racial) America as a “thought criminal” guilty of numerous “hate crimes” (including “Reckless Intolerance,” “Receiving Stolen Privilege,” and “Grand Theft Human Dignity”), and thus having little else to do […]

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Lawrence Auster directs us to the renowned 11th edition of Encyclopedia Britannica, from 1910; specifically, to page 344 of Volume 19 and an article entitled “Negro.” What did we know about “the negro” in 1910? Mentally the negro is inferior to the white. Race differences in intelligence, which in the age before political correctness were […]

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While we determine the veracity of Albert Schweitzer’s alleged quotation, try these instead. Booker T. Washington (1856–1915), mixed-race (black/white) author, educator, and black leader: There is a class of colored people who make a business of keeping the troubles, the wrongs and the hardships of the Negro race before the public. Having learned that they […]

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When I am unable to write a substantial post because of other obligations, I will endeavor to entertain and enlighten you, my loyal and cuddly readers, with historical (and therefore hilariously/hideously politically-incorrect) quotations about race. Today’s installment: Albert Schweitzer (1875–1965) — philosopher, physician, humanitarian, musician, musicologist, theologian, medical missionary to Africa, and winner of the […]

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